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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:13 pm 
Aurorae Lunares
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The first 15 episodes of Glitter Force Doki Doki are now streaming on Netflix. Is anyone here going to watch it?


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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:32 pm 
Luna Crescens
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I don't think so, Doki Doki is the worst Precure series for me and with such a butchered dub it would be a torture watching it. I wonder if they will censor all the lesbian subtex though....


Last edited by SignorinaTsukino on Fri Aug 18, 2017 8:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:58 pm 
Aurorae Lunares
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Neon Genesis wrote:
The first 15 episodes of Glitter Force Doki Doki are now streaming on Netflix. Is anyone here going to watch it?

I will,I have nothing better to do. I have soft spot for kiddie dubs


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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 11:00 pm 
Solaris Luna
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Well, it would seem episodes 15 cover Doki's first 21 episodes with scenes from dropped episodes moved in order to, for lack of a harsher term, streamline the plot along. At first, this didn't give me much confidence but diving in, it was... surprising.

Much like LBX: Little Battlers Experience which had two 40+ episode seasons shrink into 26 episodes each, it's similar to how a movie adapts from a book in a liberal way yet manages to carry over the story fairly faithfully for what its worth to its credit.

Of course, Doki Doki's never been a very popular series so fans so far have expressed mixed feelings.

Think The Neverending Story and The Shining.

I'd say that the script and voice work more than make this adaptation worth watching. Debby Derryberry's Mana "Maya" Aida for one is very cute and actually more enjoyable than the original if I may blaspheme. Stephanie Sheh's known for her Usagi but shown her great range with Makoto "Mackenzie" Kenzaki.

So... yeah. If you got a Netflix account (or know someone you can borrow from), binge watch it if only out of pure curiosity and see how you truly feel. Rage or be fascinated at the changes.


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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 3:40 am 
Luna Nova
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I'll never understand why (not that many) people got into Pretty Cure 5. I think it's the most gripping out of all of them. The first few episodes for the rest are a bit wobbly for me.


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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 5:55 am 
Lumen Cinereum
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Laura Bailey = Rise from USA adaptation Persona 4. Nice.

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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 8:58 am 
Luna Crescens
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tomoki wrote:
I'll never understand why (not that many) people got into Pretty Cure 5. I think it's the most gripping out of all of them. The first few episodes for the rest are a bit wobbly for me.
Me too. I still wonder why it is so popular here in Italy, considering how lousy it is.(especially the first series)


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 Post subject: Re: The Official Pretty Cure Discussion Thread
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 6:55 am 
Systema Solare
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https://twitter.com/leah_cinnamon/statu ... 5535330307 (From this magazine issue)

aers wrote:
translation of an interview with the leader of bandai's precure toys team, which is a perspective we rarely get on precure's creation


https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Q6O ... obilebasic

Quote:
When it comes to the world of Precure, the task of creating merchandise, including toys, is extremely large. We met the Bandai employee responsible for coming up with the concepts for those toys, and asked about the interesting parts and the hard parts of toy creation.

Interviewer: What exactly is the work that you do on creating designs for toys?

Hasegawa: Precure teams can be up to eight people, and for this season specifically, I’m responsible for various products, such as the transformation compacts they use in the show and plushies of Pekorin, at the concept stage. First, the person in charge of the concept starts with the wild delusion of “man, it would be great if there were a toy of that” (laughs), and then if the section chief approves the concept, it goes to the design people... or something like that. When I go to talk to the design people, at first they usually tell me, “We can’t do that” (laughs). And then I’m like “Please don’t say things like that” or “So, when will the design be done?”

So it’s a battle between you, huh?

For example, with the compacts, they’re something that a child has to be able to hold in their hand, so I wanted to make them as small as possible. But the design people told me, “We can’t make it that small.” So I went, well, if you shave off two millimeters here, you can make the button smaller... that kind of thing. Children’s hands are smaller than you think, so while an adult might hold it and think “Well, it’s good enough,” a three-year-old would have a hard time holding it and their hand would shake and whatnot. So it’s reasonable there would be conflict over that.

I see. What is the schedule like from the beginning until the actual product comes out?

For a physical object, going from deciding on the concept to the actual product coming into the world can take more than half a year. For example, with the products that were timed to come out with the debut of the new series (February), like the transformation items and outfits and the plushies of the characters, and the small dolls that children can play pretend with, we had to get moving on those last year.

Are the ideas for toys suggested by Bandai?

Something like that. They say things like “This is what’s popular with young girls lately,” or “This year we want to have them transform with compacts,” or “We want to promote this kind of toy,” and those are taken as suggestions for products. From there we talk to Toei Animation, and note down information about the actual story and world, and that’s the process.

Do you conduct any kind of research or surveys of children?

Yes. There’s not a set number of times per year that we do it, but our team does do a sort of survey of fads. In addition, when we’re deciding on a design for the item, we usually show several patterns to children and give a questionnaire on them.

This season’s KiraKira Precure A La Mode introduces five main characters right from the start. Does Bandai have a say in the number of Precures there should be?

What we do is suggest toys and products; the character creation is all Toei Animation. Though we might, for example, share information like “This color is popular with kids.” Just talking about this season, I think that the producer Kaminoki (Yuu) was the one who said “I want to start with a lot of characters so that it’s colorful from the beginning.”

The main motifs this season are desserts and animals. How was this decided on?

It was initially decided following a meeting with Ms. Kaminoki. It didn’t really feel like a formal conference--it wasn’t quite what they call girl talk, but... (laughs). We said things like “Sweets are cute, don’t you think?” and “I want to illustrate their personalities with animals.” Of course, she was the one who said “Wouldn’t a strawberry rabbit be adorable? I think kids would really like that”--she got excited about it (laughs).

What are the points that you consider when choosing a motif?

First of all, choosing a motif that children like. After that, in the case of Precure, is how to make transformations that incorporate the motif, but also to what extent kids will be able to imitate those transformations. Moreover, even though compacts are very popular with kids, it wouldn’t be a good thing to use compacts in every season. Those are the kinds of things we worry about.

I see.

Sentai and Kamen Rider shows use the robots and the belts every season. Somehow, little boys don’t seem to get bored even if the item is always the same (laughs). But little girls are more changeable, so we have to change the item every year. Last year was stuffed animals, this year is compacts, next year will be something else again... and so on. Maybe it’s that their mothers say “Didn’t I buy that last year?” (laughs) Maybe girls’ toys, more than boys’ toys, understand girls’ point of view and that they worry about their mothers’ approval, I think. They’re so sensitive to other’s feelings, and that influences them, I feel.

Of all the toys you’ve designed up to now, which one did you feel the greatest response to?

The “Linkle Smartbook” from Mahoutsukai Precure that came out last year. The Linkle Smartbook had an LCD, so it was expensive. The LCD wasn’t unique to the Linkle Smartbook--we do a toy like that every year--but it sold more than previous years. Of course, you could play at taking care of Ha-chan with it, and I think it went well when it became a transformation item in the latter half of the series.

That gadget was really surprising.

As far as the story is concerned, it was decided that Ha-chan would become a Precure in the second half. So then she ended up not needing to be taken care of anymore (laughs). In that case, we thought, if the Smartbook becomes her transformation item, people can enjoy it in the second half too.

This season’s Kira Kira Precure a la Mode has sweets as its motif, but there haven’t been any toys that have come out that, for example, let children make their own sweets, have there?

Not at this time. The children that enjoy watching Precure and then go and buy the toys range in age from three years old to about first grade. So if we were to release, for example, a toy that would let you easily make pancakes from a mix, they wouldn’t easily be able to play with it on their own. And in the case of products incorporating electric ranges, the recommended age range for that is eight and up.

I see, so those are the circumstances.

That said, though there aren’t any toys like that, the candy department, which is responsible for toys containing candy, has put out a kit for making whipped cream easily just by mixing. It’s not just the toy team working on Precure; the whole company is involved in the project. Though the girls’ toy department doesn’t particularly say these things, when it’s asked “what products should we make next year?” various information like “We should make better use of the candy department” is shared and in this way the company tackles the project together.

The broadcast of the current series is close to the halfway point. What has the response been?

I feel like the number of children imitating the transformation sequences is almost unprecedentedly large. I guess combining squirrels with custard and cats with macarons and whatnot was really catchy? And maybe the “Let’s mix it up!” catchphrase was also good. I have a four-year-old daughter, and every evening she says something like “Here, this is where Custard comes, like this!” and she makes me watch the five-person transformation scene.

Ahaha. That’s so cute!

Of course, Princess and Mahoutsukai were also cute, but I think Precure a la Mode feels more familiar. And this year’s transformation items, the compacts, are also incredibly popular. Compacts by themselves are items that have a strong draw, but this year we put [the wand and indentation used in the show for] “Let’s mix it up!” into them--you might think it’s makeup, but you’d be wrong (laughs). I don’t really understand the specifications, but it has such strong interest as a toy that it’s become Bandai’s top seller of the year. I’m happy that we’ve been able to give children something they enjoy.

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